Lydia Kraus

Teaching
Coming soon

Scientific services
WAY 2017, 2018 (PC Member)
STAST 2017, 2018 (PC Member)
USEC 2017 (Reviewer)
EuroUSEC 2016 (Reviewer)
CT2CM 2012, 2013 (PC Member)
Privacy Berlin 2013-2017 (Organizing Committee Member)

Dr.-Ing. Lydia Kraus

I'm a postdoctoral researcher in usable security at the Centre for Research on Cryptography and Security at Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic.

Current aim of my research

“I want to design security solutions for end-users and developers that strike an optimal balance between security and usability and offer an added value in the everyday life of their users.”

Bio

I obtained my Doctor of Engineering (Dr.-Ing., Ph.D. equivalent) from Technical University of Berlin in 2017 with a thesis on the user experience with security and privacy mechanisms on smartphones. From 2013 to 2017, I was employed at Technical University of Berlin as a researcher at the Quality and Usability Lab which was also part of Telekom Innovation Labs. During this time, I was also a fellow of Software Campus, a professional development program for future IT executives (2015-2017). From 2010 to 2012, I had the pleasure to gain a lot of interesting impressions while living and working abroad as a researcher at the Mihajlo Pupin Institute in Belgrade, Serbia, in the field of IT-supported emergency management. I received my Diploma degree (Dipl.-Ing., M.Sc. equivalent) in Electrical engineering and Information Technology with a major in Communications engineering from Technical University of Munich (TUM) in 2009.

Research

Experiences are episodes in our everyday life that help us to learn and make sense of the world. They usually go along with intense emotions - shaping us, our opinions, and our relationships with others. Using technology can provide people with experiences, too. In order to design technology in an optimal way, we need to understand which experiences people had and have with technology and how we can shape these experiences in a positive way.

My main interest is to understand users' and developers' experiences with security and privacy mechanisms. A focus of my work has been on smartphone security. Together with colleagues from TU Berlin and Ben Gurion University, Israel, we have investigated how users generally feel about smartphone security and privacy (see our paper, published at MoST 2015). To further understand what motivates users to deploy security and privacy mechanisms on their smartphone, we have investigated how psychological needs motivate usage and shape experiences (see our article, published in the Journal of Information Security and Applications, 2017). Together with colleagues from TU Berlin, Ulm University, and University of Michigan, we've further explored how Emoji-based mobile authentication performs in the wild (see our paper, published at IFIP SEC 2017; a short summary of the paper is also available in the Conversation). A survey about user experience in authentication research is also provided in our PQS 2016 paper.

I've recently started to work together with my colleague Martin Ukrop on investigating the usability of cryptographic APIs, thus exploring IT professionals as a user group. Updates will follow soon.